Love and Duty – Chapter 2

Disclaimer in pt. 1

 

Sam opened her mouth wordlessly and her blue eyes widened.

 

General Hammond gestured for close the door. “Sit down, major. From your reaction, I can see what a shock this must be for you.” He sat down at his desk.

 

Sam continued to stare at the man in front of her until propriety snapped her out of her daze to answer the general. “Uh, yes, sir, it is, it’s…wow. I thought you were dead.” She replied dumbly.

 

The man shook his head. “No, but it was close. I, along with some others, managed to escape through the Stargate minutes after the Goa’uld began their assault. We have been traveling for many months and have only recently begun to settle. Understandably, as we escaped, it was obvious that we did not have sufficient time to gather any of our technology. We have been reduced to rebuilding our world with the limited number of survivors and the lack of building materials, it has been extremely difficult.”

 

“Why didn’t you come to Earth, Narim? We would’ve helped you.” Sam questioned.

 

“Unfortunately, there are some among the surviving Tollans that believe that the people from Earth were indirectly responsible for the Goa’uld’s presence on Tollana and then there are others who have managed to retain their arrogance and superiority and firmly believe that we do not need help from such…”

 

“Inferior races?” Sam supplied.

 

Narim nodded sheepishly.

 

“Fair enough. What are you doing here now?”

 

“Narim has approached us with an interesting plea, Major; it appears that the Tollans are in need of our help.” General Hammond twined his hands together and laid them on his desk.

 

“Ah, yes, recently a situation has developed and we have neither the manpower nor technology to aid us. Two weeks ago, we managed to develop our phase shifting technology with an added feature using what limited supplies we have.”

 

“You mean the technology that allows you to walk through our iris and other solid objects, right?” Sam asked.

 

“Yes, well, it was the first step towards rebuilding our technology. The remaining Tollans felt for the first time in the past months that perhaps rebuilding our society would not be as daunting a task as we had first thought. Unfortunately, in the midst of our excitement, a Goa’uld spy had infiltrated into our populace and managed to steal the prototype. Luckily, he was intercepted before he could also obtain the plans to build more of our phase-shifting technology. The spy escaped and it has taken us until now to gather sparse Intel on where this spy took our prototype and whom he worked for. The spy, it turns out, serves the Goa’uld System lord named Nephthys, who resides on the planet of Okran. It seems pretty clear that this system lord plans to learn about our machinery and doubtless, replicate more for her own purposes.”

 

Sam scrunched up her forehead as the name of the system lord rang a bell in her mind. “Nephthys…hold on…she sounds familiar…” Sam shook her head as the familiarity of the name faded away. Guess I’ll have to hit Daniel’s books. “What’s this added feature you were talking about?”

 

“Even before our home world was destroyed, we have been trying to create a device that causes the individual wearing the device to fade out or blend in with their surroundings. Such a device would be extremely effective in the dark as it would make the wearer seem as if they have mysteriously disappeared to anyone watching.”

 

Sam gaped in astonishment. Such a technological feat could only be described in one word. “Cool.”  

 

“So,” she took a deep breath. “Let me guess, you want us to see if we can get your phase-shifting prototype back from this Nephthys?”

 

Narim nodded sadly. “Not only would it help us, but it would also be beneficial to you as well. Technology such as this would be dangerous in the hands of any Goa’uld.”

 

“Agreed, Narim. That is why I am authorizing this.” General Hammond acknowledged.

 

Sam paused to rub at her eyes. “Sir, with respect, what I don’t understand is if you’re allowing this mission to go ahead, why isn’t the rest of SG-1 here?” Sam felt a sudden unease at the glances exchanged between Narim and the General. “General, sir…?”

 

General Hammond cleared his throat. “Well, major, perhaps Narim would like to explain the entire situation to you.”

 

Sam returned her attention to Narim and cocked an eyebrow. 

 

“Your General Hammond and I have discussed possible solutions to this growing dilemma. I do not necessarily want any of your people to get hurt if you should choose to undertake this mission, so ever since I presented the idea of going to your people for help, the Tollans have been at work to develop another working phase-shift prototype which is the one I used to pass through your iris a short while ago. Unfortunately, the Tollans have only developed this single unit and General Hammond has agreed with me that to wait any longer, for other working prototypes would cost us time we do not have. We also agree that if one of your people were selected to go alone on this mission, the use of the prototype I carry would weigh the favor of success greatly to your side.” Narim stood and crossed the room to kneel beside Sam, who seemed in a state of shock at what was being proposed to her. “There is another thing you must know, Samantha, while developing the second model, a minor problem was discovered. It seems that the longer the phase-shifting technology is in use, a small amount of dangerous energy waves builds up in the device. This energy if not properly regulated and dealt with can cause an explosion that is considered incredibly devastating.”

 

“This is the reason why I believe that you would be the best officer to undertake this mission, major. Narim has promised to brief you on the use of the phase-shifting technology and on what you need to know to possibly disarm the device should it begin to explode. I feel that your expertise as well as your military skills would be beneficial as opposed to sending someone like Colonel O’Neill.” General Hammond stared at Sam. “This is entirely up to you, major, the decision is yours.”

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